Linking Past with Future

Innovation: It's in our DNA! Video

Several learning laboratories at the Garfield Center have been named after these prominent innovators in Kaiser Permanente's history.


Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

As an education research director in the late 1960s, Frances Bobbie Collen established a national pilot for KP, which was the first health education of its kind. This new idea was among the first to use technology as a way to educate patients-teaching healthy people the right preventive maintenance methods to help keep them well, while more quickly and effectively caring for patients that were ill.


Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

Morris Frank Collen, MD

Dr. Collen was among the first physicians to join the fledgling organization at Kaiser's Richmond shipyards in 1942. As the founding partner of The Permanente Medical Group, he foresaw the future promise of computers in the field of medicine. In 1966, he made an astute observation that "the computer will probably have the greatest impact on medical science since the invention of the microscope." As a tribute to Dr. Collen, the Morris F. Collen Award of Excellence is presented by the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

Cecil C. Cutting, MD

Dr. Cutting's vision in 1965 was to create "not a clinic, not a hospital, but a building for health." As one of the pioneering physicians who joined founding physician Sidney R. Garfield as chief surgeon on the construction site of the Grand Coulee Dam, he was the first Executive Director of The Permanente Medical Group. He believed that a new type of medical facility would emerge to contain a screening center, laboratories, and data processing center.


Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

Dorothea Daniels, RN, BS, MA, Ed.D.

Dorothea Daniels was the first woman to become a Kaiser Permanente hospital administrator and was also the first director of the Permanente Foundation Hospital School of Nursing in Oakland. Sidney R. Garfield nicknamed her the "Henry J. Kaiser of nursing" because of her innovative spirit, creativity, and vision.

 


Frances Bobbie Collen, BA, MA, RN

Clair O'Sullivan Lisker, RN, BSN, MScN

Clair Lisker is a 1951 alumna of the former Kaiser School of Nursing and, following her graduation, remained with the school until it closed. In later years, she served as the nursing administrator and associate administrator of the Oakland Medical Center, until retiring in 1991. Ms. Lisker's leadership influenced the School of Nursing to be progressive for its time, enrolling women and men of all races and backgrounds, and stressing preventive patient care and education. She remains active as a volunteer at KP today.

 

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You are participants in a medical experiment that can be of inestimable value to the future of medicine.

Sidney R. Garfield, MD , 1943