What We Do

Utilizing the Garfield Innovation Center

The Garfield Innovation Center is a place to test ideas and develop solutions in a hands-on, mocked-up clinical environment. Many aspects of delivering healthcare can be innovated and examined at the Center using real-world scenarios and interactive methods, such as simulations, rapid prototyping, and experiential learning.

A large rapid prototyping area provides space for quick design development, a technology lab insures products will be tested to their limit without affecting patient care, and learning labs for debriefing after activities.

Learn About Our Activities

Various activities at the Garfield Innovation Center help drive innovation in health care delivery. The activities, often used in combination, are described below with examples from recent projects:

 

  • Simulations
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Technology Testing
  • Training
  • Product Evaluation
  • Video Production

Simulations

At the Garfield Innovation Center, simulations are representations of real-world scenarios, mostly performed in a mocked-up clinical space. In a scenario, participants "act out" various clinical roles (e.g. nurses, physicians, assistants, technicians, etc.). Observers and participants evaluate the processes, equipment, architecture, and technology during and after the event. Data is gathered and analyzed using different techniques and technologies, such as video, still photography, path charting, and pedometer readings.

Note: Simulations can also be computer based virtual world simulations. Virtual world simulations have the potential to create a training, learning, and collaboration medium that allows entirely new capabilities and experiences.

 



Simulating a nurse shift change using KP HealthConnect in the inpatient unit

Simulating a nurse shift change using KP HealthConnect in the inpatient unit

 
Simulation Example

Participants in the Organizational Effectiveness and Learning Services Summit (representing six regions) simulated an inpatient KP HealthConnect (KPHC) "go-live" implementation. The purpose of the simulation was to better understand how KPHC trainers could support clinicians during "go-live".

In the simulation, participants ran through typical workflow scenarios (such as checking patient histories and administering medication) using KP HealthConnect on wireless carts. The realistic hospital setting provided an environment where participants could better understand KP HealthConnect training and the support needed to assist hospital staff and clinicians before, during, and after installations. A key lesson learned from the simulation was that future KP HealthConnect training materials could be more reflective of typical clinical workflows. The simulation also gave trainers the opportunity to experience how it feels to be a nurse using the software simultaneously with interactions from other clinicians and family interruptions



Simulating a patient assessment using KP HealthConnect in the Critical Care room.

Simulating a patient assessment using KP HealthConnect in the Critical Care room.

 

Rapid Prototyping

Prototyping is problem-solving in three dimensions. At the Garfield Innovation Center, you can prototype many different things - a proposed workflow, room, product, service, or a technology. Ranging from simple proof-of-concept models to working prototypes that are practically finished products, prototyping lets you fail early to succeed sooner.



Medication room prototype

Medication room prototype

 
Rapid Prototyping Examples

A National Facilities Services team created two inpatient medication room prototypes in less than a week using simple, cost-effective cardboard and sheetrock structures to create rooms, tables, and equipment. Vendors provided additional equipment temporarily for the evaluation timeframe. Various frontline clinical staff (including nurses, physicians, and pharmacists) gave feedback about the design, flow, and layout of the room.



Rearranging layout of the medication room

Rearranging layout of the medication room by front line staff.

 

During an Idea Fair, planned and facilitated by the Innovation Consultancy, clinicians brainstormed ideas to develop safer, more efficient medication rooms. After simulating tasks (role-playing) in the prototyped med rooms the teams debriefed, then used paper layouts of the room to help develop new designs. Changes were made immediately in the prototype space. The simulations were run again and additional debriefing took place, maximizing learnings in a short amount of time.



Evaluating the medication room prototype with post-it notes by roles: nurse, physician, pharmacist.

Evaluating the medication room prototype with post-it notes by roles: nurse, physician, pharmacist.

Technology Testing

By understanding emerging trends in technology, KP can better plan and prepare its people and infrastructure to support new technologies and paradigm shifts in the delivery of care. Driven by KP-IT's newly formed Innovation and Advanced Technology (IAT) group, technology testing at the Garfield Innovation Center includes the study and evaluation of new technologies and innovations. Technology assessments incorporate technology/product demonstrations, viability tests, and pilot programs. Assessments serve to combine discussions/evaluations of technology innovation and connecting people and communities that share this common interest.



Kenji Miyaji (ITFS) and Brian Birch (EA)

Kenji Miyaji (ITFS) and Brian Birch (EA) placing a thin client in a mobile computing cart.

 
Technology Testing Example

The IAT group partnered with the Enterprise Architecture (EA), Engineering (EE), and Enterprise Operations (EO) groups to test the viability of using thin client PC's in KP's shared PC environment. Thin client computers do not have a hard drive to store information, are remotely connected to a network, have few moving and breakable parts, and are smaller than typical personal computers.

The Garfield Innovation Center was used to explore how the thin client technology integrates into various systems and clinical environments: the inpatient staff area, on wireless carts with KP Healthconnect, the outpatient exam room. The simulated care delivery environment yielded valuable insights about the viability of using thin client technology in the clinical environment. The usability testing evaluation focused on the product's potential to accomplish requirements such as ease-of-use, functionality, and the user's perception of the experience.

For more information on the thin client viability test, please go to: Thin Client Report



Product comparison from the left: HP Desktop PC, HP Neoware, HP Thin Client, Wyse Thin Client.

Product comparison from the left: HP Desktop PC, HP Neoware, HP Thin Client, Wyse Thin Client.

Training

Training using experiential learning techniques and real-life scenarios in a clinical setting can expedite and deliver lasting learning. Experiential learning engages students as active and intentional learners. Instead of being passive receivers of information, students become equal partners in the learning process. The Garfield Innovation Center setting provides a unique combination of clinical space and learning labs under one roof.



The Morris Collen, M.D. Learning Lab

The Morris Collen, M.D. Learning Lab

 
Training Example

The American Academy of Pediatrics released a new Neonatal Resuscitation Program requiring implementation. Students practiced newly learned techniques in the Labor and Delivery Room using baby mannequins and actual baby warmers along with oxygen masks, intubation tools and other typical clinical supplies.



Practicing neonatal resuscitation techniques

Practicing neonatal resuscitation techniques

Product Evaluation

The Garfield Innovation Center is an ideal location to demonstrate and test furniture, equipment, biomedical equipment, and information technology products being evaluated for clinical use at Kaiser Permanente. Strategic partners, such as the Product Council and the National Materials Leadership Teams, can assess products with front line care delivery staff and members using the center's clinical settings and prototyping space to enhance the process.

Multi-day product evaluations give KP experts the opportunity to see similar products in side-by-side comparisons in a clinical environment. Cost savings can be derived from evaluating products in a clinical setting before they are selected as a standard and deployed to multiple sites.



Testing out the newest features on a hospital bed.

Testing out the newest features on a hospital bed.

 
Product Evaluation Example

The National Product Council hosted a Bed and Stretcher evaluation where 12 vendors presented and demonstrated dozens of products at the Garfield Innovation Center. Evaluators took advantage of the inpatient hospital space to see how the beds and stretchers functioned "on-the-move". Products were pushed through hallways, around corners, and in and out of rooms.



Evaluating Evacusleds for purchase at KP.

Evaluating Evacusleds for purchase at KP.

Video Production

Video producers will appreciate the opportunity to film in the Garfield Innovation Center mock clinical setting. It provides far more space and sound control than a live environment. A crew can be scheduled more deliberately and conclude projects with the increased efficiency of far fewer retakes.



Video taping George Halvorson for a Quality communications message.

Video taping George Halvorson for a Quality communications message .

 
Video Production Example

The Nurse Knowledge Exchange team produced a video reviewing program practices and highlighting program benefits. Each medical center in Kaiser Permanente will be provided with a copy to use as a training resource. Additionally, this innovation will be shared outside KP with other healthcare organizations.



Video taping a Nurse Knowledge Exchange (NKE) in the Special Needs Med-Surg room.

Video taping a Nurse Knowledge Exchange (NKE) in the Special Needs Med-Surg room.

 

 

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